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  • frankiezafe 18:27 on 2016-12-08 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: choreography, , , ,   

    15418547_1293283904070196_1467331030769321977_o

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    A two days work session with Florence, Lisa Nelson, @louise and Baptiste.

    We went deeper in the improvisation technique of Lisa, by performing a score with Baptiste and also by talking a lot about what Tuning Scores is and is not. The performance and the exchanges have been recorded.

    This is an important step for the future of the project: a prototype is ready but there were a lot of blind spots that are becoming brighter and brighter each time we talk.

    You can discover the project tomorrow: event

     
  • frankiezafe 22:47 on 2016-10-30 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Chaise pagholz in blender, with @louise.

    chair-screenshot

     
  • xuv 17:43 on 2016-10-25 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    Polymorph weekly news #9 

    Tuning Scores chair physics

    No news is good news. Polymorph is alive and kicking. The train is on its tracks. The ball is rolling.

    It’s already almost a week since I’ve chatted with @frankiezafe and @louise about the advancements of their project. You might have also noted that they don’t post much either on this blog. As François says it, it’s because the progress they make is not that big of  step to share, or does not produce some visuals that would look good on the blog. Back a couple weeks, when features where being added almost every day, things were exciting. Now, the real work of polishing and improving what has been initiated is actually happening and that just does not seem as exciting to share. Although it’s exciting for the team to see it growing.

    A second meeting with Contredanse was much more productive and finally we started talking about gameplay. Baptiste and Florence could put their hands on the mouse and feel what a player could feel. Discussion ensued on object movements and reactions in the virtual world. The manipulation of the camera created interesting problems and awkwardness that needs to be addressed. And a common set of objects has been defined and should be limited to a stone, a stick, a chair, a cup and a chain for now. @louise is iterating on the appearance of those and playing around with their physics properties.

    François is deep into physics programming. He also took a big decision regarding all the tools he is building. Instead of trying to produce some independent Ogre libraries, he will concentrate on making it all work in the Polymorph Engine (PE). As a reminder, the PE is a bundle, a package of great open source libraries to make video games. The choice to release work as a bundle instead as independent modules is mainly a practical one. It will take less time to code. The modules are also very much interdependent for now. So making them detachable from the PE would require extra work that the team does not have at the moment. Maybe in the future. But again, making a full featured game engine on top of Ogre was always one of the goal of Polymorph. The ability to break this apart is then for later.

    Where is PEEL you might ask? On hold for now. Tuning Scores is the priority since the prototype needs to be delivered by December. All eyes are on this goal now. And challenges remain, such as multiple mouses input for example. Anyway, all progress on Tuning Score is good for PEEL. So no worries, François will be back on it for Christmas.

    See you next time.

    PS: All screenshots by @louise

    Tuning Scores chair

     
  • frankiezafe 20:01 on 2016-10-21 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ,   

    Today: XML

    Until now, @louise was not able to access objects position and configuration… I guess it was quite frustrating for her, as she is working on the assets of the Tuning Score game.

    Now it’s better. Based on the work made for #PEEL, a XML description of the objects to load is available.

    It looks like this:

    selection_698

    Each polymorph node is an object having:

    • an origin transformation;
    • a local transformation, only applied on the mesh attached to this node, not its children;
    • a primitive to display, when you don’t need to load a mesh – available: cube, sphere, plane & empty (very useful, i got it now);
    • a mesh to display;
    • a material, when you want to use something else than the default one;
    • a bullet configuration, for physics, dynamic or static, with the possibility to use a special mesh and a configuration tag that gives access to a few physical parameters.

    I’m going to deploy this on louise computer and it will be over for this week!

     
    • frankiezafe 00:11 on 2016-10-22 Permalink | Reply

      note: provide a DTD to validate and explains the XML > check if tinyxml supports it.

  • frankiezafe 17:22 on 2016-10-06 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ,   

    Demo with of a chain using bullet:

    ogre-render-window_695

    ogre-render-window_696

    Meshes (displayable and physical) are desgned in #blender by @louise !

    anneau

    screenshot-from-2016-10-06-18-16-26

     
  • xuv 00:01 on 2016-09-24 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , F/LAT, KDEnlive, , , ,   

    Polymorph weekly news #7 

    rendu_object_21sept4

    Welcome @louise! As a new member, she just joined the Polymorph team and this post will be presenting her to you and hopefully tell you more about her role and interest in the Polymorph project.

    I did not know Louise Baduel before having a conversation with her a couple hours ago. All I knew is that @frankiezafe had met her during the Blender workshop he gave at iMAL a few months ago and that he had offered her to work on the video game project he is working on for the company Contredanse.

    So Louise is a choreographer, dancer and videographer living in Brussels. She co-founded the dance collective System Failure and is interested in studying and understanding the relation between sound and performance. She also does video editing and wanted to start manipulating 3D objects and create them. That’s why she decided to come to a Blender class. She admitted having downloaded Blender 6 years ago, but needed a little push to get up to speed with the technology. And apparently, François’s classes were very helpful in that sense. So helpful that Louise agreed to join the Polymorph team and jump full time in Blender on a Linux system.

    Louise told me she had been quite interested in libre and open source software for a while. She is fed up with Apple’s logic. “I need to get out of this, she said. But working with video has been a show stopper for me as it is not as easy to do with Linux.” Now that she’s been working with Blender and Linux intensively for the past two weeks, she said she was ready to try video editing with Blender. She also tried KDEnlive last week but found it to be missing some features compared to FinalCut. But she likes this new approach to making things and will definitely experiment more now with this fully open source toolbox.

    At the same time she arrived at Polymorph, she also discovered F/LAT. She said she appreciate the feeling there and that everybody is happy to be helping each other when there is a problem or a question around open source software. “There is always someone available to answer a question” she said, and that helps her learn a lot every day.

    As you may have seen from @louise posts on this website, she is working on “Tuning Scores”, the code name for now for the video game being developed with professional dancers in mind. Tuning Scores is actually a series of techniques for dancers, put together by Lisa Nelson, to develop spontaneous compositions. And Polymorph is commissioned by Contredanse to port this into the virtual world of an interactive application, or so called, video game.

    There is many challenges in a project like this. It will be a game for two players. And there will have a palette of 3D objects to play with. The objects will be kept simple but the rules governing their behavior will be complex. Special attention will be given to the sound each object makes. The point here is not to be literal but to create a sensation. Dancers work with their feelings and need to feel the space they are in. The virtual world needs to be rich enough to invite the participants to interact with it and with each other. How will a dancer perceive the presence of another dancer in the game? How will they communicate? How can a dancer perform according to the rules of “Tuning Scores”? The players need to be able to repeat a set of actions s·he just made or play it backwards, freeze or sustain it. And overall what would be the purpose of this tool?

    Definitely there is a demand from Contredanse to get the word out about the “Tuning Scores” practice and the work of Lisa Nelson. This is one of the reason to come up with a project like this, but where could this head up to? Since sound is involved and reactive to the players actions, it could be a way to create or compose music. It could also be an application to put 2 dancers distant from each other physically and have them interact in the same room. It could also possibly be an instrument for live performance.

    All these questions will hopefully find an answer in the coming months, but they are certainly driving Louise research right now, with the help of the rest of the Polymorph team. This is a unique project and possibly the first of its kind. So keep an eye on this website for regular posts in this matter. And don’t worry, @frankie hasn’t left the development of PEEL. It’s advancing. Bullet is now integrated. But I’ll ask all about it when I’ll chat with Francois next week.

    In the meantime, stay tuned, and share responsibly.

     
  • xuv 22:00 on 2016-09-09 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ,   

    Polymorph weekly news #6 

    overall-structure-20160930-liberties-002-text

    If you’re following this series of weekly news, you’ve noticed there hasn’t been any for the past few weeks. I apologize for this. It does not mean Polymorph was on hold or that I lost contact with the team, but I just did not have much time to write a post and do the regular interviews of the different participants. But this week, I’m back on track and was invited to participate in the dev meeting with @frankiezafe, @balt and Olm. So let’s summarize this 3 hours meeting in a couple points that hopefully will invite you to dig further and come to the next one. Because, since Polymorph is actually an open source game development platform, you are all welcome to join, anytime you want.

    Out of the many things that have been developed around Ogre for the past few weeks, the last notable one is an addon to handle game controllers. François has finished and tested it with Olm and Balthazar. They’ve even tried to plug in multiple mouse controllers in one machine to see how that would work. But although this could be possible on a Linux machine, it’s not as easy as it sounds. While the idea of creating a game for multiple users on the same computer, each with his/her own mouse, is appealing, the complexity and the limitation in terms of OS choice don’t make it a priority for Polymorph at this time. If a project comes up that requires it, further research will be done in that direction. As for now, the Ogre addon for game controllers works. It’s not going to be an official addon as the Ogre community requires that unit tests must be written for it in order to make it into the official list.  But since it’s open source and the code available here, if someone wants to jump on it and do it, you’re more than welcome.

    The conversation went on about PEEL’s gameplay and especially how the player moves around and manipulates objects. As you can see in the video below, things run smoothly. But an interesting conversation happened between Olm, Balthazar and Francois on how to improve things and make it even smoother.

    François then introduced his plan on how to configure each levels using XML files. Basically, each level is fully described by a tree of options and parameters, which makes it a fast and convenient way to create new levels. Discussion went around the structure of the XML, where to add and define sound parameters and so on. Which then evolved in a whole conversation on how to best use the sound engine (aka Pure-Data) that is now fully part of the Polymorph Engine. Pure-Data, for those who don’t know, is the open source equivalent of Max/MSP. A very powerful realtime sound synthesizer, making the Polymorph Engine a musical instrument in itself.

    As for PEEL, being a minimalist game in  terms of 3D objects and environment, the sound will be crucial to give a sense of space and set the overall mood of the game. We’re taking about spacial sound and realtime sound effects, of course, done with the help of Daniel Perez Hajdu.

    Regarding the development of Polymorph Engine, many questions are still open. What about the compilation on Android? Lacking tools and access to proper Android hardware, Francois has not managed to compile it for this platform yet. There is also big questions hanging in the air regarding shadows. Francois has not figured out how all that works. It might be not so important for PEEL, but the next project will require it.

    And since we are already talking about the next project, @louise will be joining Polymorph next week to start working on the Contredanse application. She will be doing research on the gameplay and work on the integration of the 3D elements in the game engine. While @frankiezafe will be in charge of integrating Bullet (the physics engine) and finding all the help in can get from the Ogre community to get the shadows working.

    So stay tuned, come visit us and pass on the information around you, that’s also a way to show support to this project. And see you next week.

     
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