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  • xuv 17:35 on 2017-01-09 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , installation, Linux,   

    Polymorph Engine on ArchLinux 

    Thanks to the great work and tutorial from @frankiezafe, I managed to compile and run the basic examples of Polymorph on an ArchLinux system. I had to make a few changes to the documentation and find the right flags for some libraries (instructions here). But everything seems to be running smoothly. More tests to come later, I guess.

    ArchLinux screenshot running Polymorph Engnie basic sample

    Save

     
  • frankiezafe 18:01 on 2016-11-09 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Linux, osx, , virtual machine   

    macosx-vm-first-test

    Playing to tuning scores on osx requires several steps, but it worked quite smoothly.

    • Installation of virtual box – https://www.virtualbox.org/
    • Download of linux mint 18 64 bits image – https://www.linuxmint.com/download.php
    • Make a disk of 15Gb (min 10Gb are required for mint)
    • To have local IP (router range), set network to bridged and use ethernet – not tested with wifi
    • Install mint
    • Update mint
    • Copy/paste Tuning score exec folder (not availabe online yet…)
    • And done!

    Because there no 3d acceleration available on the configuration i used, i had to give 3 cores out of 4 to the vm to reach a decent framerate. There no FSAA available either. But Lisa Nelson will at least be able to take something back to the states!

     
  • xuv 00:01 on 2016-09-24 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , F/LAT, KDEnlive, Linux, , ,   

    Polymorph weekly news #7 

    rendu_object_21sept4

    Welcome @louise! As a new member, she just joined the Polymorph team and this post will be presenting her to you and hopefully tell you more about her role and interest in the Polymorph project.

    I did not know Louise Baduel before having a conversation with her a couple hours ago. All I knew is that @frankiezafe had met her during the Blender workshop he gave at iMAL a few months ago and that he had offered her to work on the video game project he is working on for the company Contredanse.

    So Louise is a choreographer, dancer and videographer living in Brussels. She co-founded the dance collective System Failure and is interested in studying and understanding the relation between sound and performance. She also does video editing and wanted to start manipulating 3D objects and create them. That’s why she decided to come to a Blender class. She admitted having downloaded Blender 6 years ago, but needed a little push to get up to speed with the technology. And apparently, François’s classes were very helpful in that sense. So helpful that Louise agreed to join the Polymorph team and jump full time in Blender on a Linux system.

    Louise told me she had been quite interested in libre and open source software for a while. She is fed up with Apple’s logic. “I need to get out of this, she said. But working with video has been a show stopper for me as it is not as easy to do with Linux.” Now that she’s been working with Blender and Linux intensively for the past two weeks, she said she was ready to try video editing with Blender. She also tried KDEnlive last week but found it to be missing some features compared to FinalCut. But she likes this new approach to making things and will definitely experiment more now with this fully open source toolbox.

    At the same time she arrived at Polymorph, she also discovered F/LAT. She said she appreciate the feeling there and that everybody is happy to be helping each other when there is a problem or a question around open source software. “There is always someone available to answer a question” she said, and that helps her learn a lot every day.

    As you may have seen from @louise posts on this website, she is working on “Tuning Scores”, the code name for now for the video game being developed with professional dancers in mind. Tuning Scores is actually a series of techniques for dancers, put together by Lisa Nelson, to develop spontaneous compositions. And Polymorph is commissioned by Contredanse to port this into the virtual world of an interactive application, or so called, video game.

    There is many challenges in a project like this. It will be a game for two players. And there will have a palette of 3D objects to play with. The objects will be kept simple but the rules governing their behavior will be complex. Special attention will be given to the sound each object makes. The point here is not to be literal but to create a sensation. Dancers work with their feelings and need to feel the space they are in. The virtual world needs to be rich enough to invite the participants to interact with it and with each other. How will a dancer perceive the presence of another dancer in the game? How will they communicate? How can a dancer perform according to the rules of “Tuning Scores”? The players need to be able to repeat a set of actions s·he just made or play it backwards, freeze or sustain it. And overall what would be the purpose of this tool?

    Definitely there is a demand from Contredanse to get the word out about the “Tuning Scores” practice and the work of Lisa Nelson. This is one of the reason to come up with a project like this, but where could this head up to? Since sound is involved and reactive to the players actions, it could be a way to create or compose music. It could also be an application to put 2 dancers distant from each other physically and have them interact in the same room. It could also possibly be an instrument for live performance.

    All these questions will hopefully find an answer in the coming months, but they are certainly driving Louise research right now, with the help of the rest of the Polymorph team. This is a unique project and possibly the first of its kind. So keep an eye on this website for regular posts in this matter. And don’t worry, @frankie hasn’t left the development of PEEL. It’s advancing. Bullet is now integrated. But I’ll ask all about it when I’ll chat with Francois next week.

    In the meantime, stay tuned, and share responsibly.

     
  • frankiezafe 16:49 on 2016-09-14 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Linux, Virtualbox   

    Deployment using a virtual machine.

    Thanks to virtual box, i was able to test an appllcation compiled on my desktop, and it works 🙂

    Obviously, it’s exactly the same OS, and the way i did it is NOT clean at all: i just copy/paste all the libraries in the bin folder. Hopefully, linux & ogre are kind enough to run that smoothly.

    The application is a utils to test models exported from blender.

    virtualmachine-01

    virtualmachine-02

    The installation of an os in virtualbox required a adjustement in the BIOS. See How to fix verr_vmx_msr_all_vmx_disabled to install Ubuntu on VirtualBox for details.

    More to come very soon.

     
  • frankiezafe 20:25 on 2016-09-11 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Linux   

    Repositories clean-up.

    All repositories related to polymorph are now accessible in a clean and understandable way, thanks to the team concept of bitbucket. See polymorph-team.

    There are 5 projects:

    • engine, with all the examples
    • addons, one repo/addon
    • internal, the graphical id and other stuff related to communication
    • games, one repo/game, none public yet…
    • tools, custom tools developped for specific tasks, none public yet…

    selection_681

     
  • frankiezafe 11:44 on 2016-08-18 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Linux,   

    first pages of polymorph engine’s wiki starts to be ok: https://bitbucket.org/frankiezafe/polymorph-engine/wiki/Home

     
  • frankiezafe 22:51 on 2016-07-26 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Linux,   

    Design of startup dialog for ogre : it might seems unrelevant, but i’m quite glad to have change the background image and colors of this window. I feel more at home 🙂

    Selection_991

     
  • xuv 20:38 on 2016-07-15 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Linux, , , ,   

    Polymorph weekly news #1 

    This is the first post of what we hope to be a series, where we try to summarize and explain what happened at Polymorph during the past week. For this one, I interviewed @frankiezafe and asked him about the development of the different projects at Polymorph.

    PEEL

    Peel is the code name for the first game developped inside Polymorph. François was working on this project since a while and started with a first concept, which gave it its name. As portrayed in this video, the idea was to solve a puzzle, to find your way through a labyrinth by peeling a 3D sculpture. This concept came after a workshop François gave about Three.js.

    If you’ve followed some posts from this week, the concept is evolving into something completely new and different. The name is kept, but the principles have evolved into a different game, one where the player has to assemble different 3D pieces in order to solve a puzzle.

    modules-with-lighting_001

    Since this is going to be the first game published by Polymoph, Francois is looking for something more interesting in terms of gameplay than just a little project that you would discard after 2 minutes. The goal behind PEEL is to test the workflow and the tools, but not only. The purpose of Polymorph is to also test new gameplays and new approaches in game design, this is why PEEL had to evolve in something more challenging, more interesting.

    The inner workings of the game are now more complicated and hard to put into words. So Francois is laying his ideas into schemas and graphics, both as a way to express them but also possibly ease the work of programming it afterwards.

    oo_structure_003

    Let’s see how that evolves over the next weeks.

    Polymorph Engine

    What we call the Polymorph Engine is an assembly of different tools, with at its core, the open source 3D engine called Ogre. Every monday, the dev team of Polymorph meets to discuss the tasks and needs to achieve compilation and running examples of Ogre on all the operating systems possible.

    general-kickoff-presentation-engine

    Taking OpenFrameworks as an example, the Polymorph Engine would be Ogre and some other components nicely packaged so that a game developer could easily start working on projects without having to recompile Ogre each time. The same way you just clone an empty example from OpenFrameworks to start working on your next digital art project, with Polymorph Engine, you would copy the basic default empty example and start coding and testing your project from there. This means that the compilation of Ogre would only be done once, most certainly just after downloading the latest version of the Polymorph Engine. Then just the example you are working on would be compiled each time some code is changed.

    So far, Francois had achieved compilation of Ogre 1.9 on Linux and even published a tutorial for those who would like to try it also. But the dev team of Polymorph has decided to use Ogre 2.0 for the Polymorph Engine and this is much much less documented than the previous versions of Ogre. Work needs to be done in that sense, to document and ease that process.

    During the past week, Peter has managed to compile Ogre 2.0 for Android and Debian and also compiled the first examples that come with it (aka. the Purple Screen of Joy aka “Yes, it’s working”). @balt has also managed to compile Ogre 2.0 for Linux Mint and has investigated into build farm software to automate compilation on different platforms.

    Plans for next week

    By the end of next week, we expect to have Polymorph Engine working as it should (Ogre + an empty example to be copied) for Linux. The whole Polymorph team working exclusively on Linux machines, this is priority in terms of platform so that game designers can start implementing their ideas.

    Compilation of Polymorph Engine will also be tested on Windows 10.0.

    And François will take some time off from game development because he will teach Blender for the whole week at the summer workshops of iMAL. Don’t hesitate to join him if you’re interested, there might be some seat left.

    Thank you

    If you found this post interesting or want to follow Polymorph’s activities, don’t hesitate to subscribe to our RSS feed or our Twitter account. Don’t hesitate to leave us comments, ask us questions and, of course, forward this to those who might be interested.

     
  • frankiezafe 19:04 on 2016-07-05 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , howto, Linux,   

    Complete tutorial to compile Ogre3D (version 1.10) on linux >> http://wiki.frankiezafe.org/index.php?title=Programmation:Compiler_Ogre3D_sous_linux

     
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