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  • frankiezafe 18:58 on 2017-03-23 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , gif, , video   

    Road network generation: the gif gives you an idea of the procedure executed in ~300 milliseconds by the c++.

    With a deformation:

     
  • frankiezafe 18:25 on 2017-02-01 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , tech demo, video   

    Technical demo.

    Based on the patches started yesterday evening, the example.pd shows how PD can be used with its user interface to interact RT with the engine. Once the work is done, by commenting a #define in the main class, you switch to release mode, without changing anything to the patch!

    Parts of the video:

    1. edition: puredata used with ogre3d
    2. release: libpd loads the pd patch inside of ogre3d

    As explained in this post, the edition is based on an OSC communication between the two apps, it works with the basic puredata.

    There is 2 VERY important objects in this patch:

    • pobject_in: it can parse osc messages as well as internal messages (when used in release mode); it also create 4 internal senders pobject_in_trans, pobject_in_rot, pobject_in_scale & pobject_in_all; no need to be plugged to the pobject_in box, you can receive the messages anywhere in your patches;
    • pobject_out: it can pack osc messages for the engine as well as internal messages (when used in release mode); it also create 4 internal receivers pobject_out_trans, pobject_out_rot, pobject_out_scale & pobject_out_all; no need to be plugged to the pobject_out box, you can send messages from anywhere in your patches;

    On the C++ side, the PdEngine has to be set in edition or release mode to works properly with pd. The communication with pd happens through the same methods. The idea here is to make the two modes transparent to the user, even if the c++ guy has to know what he’s doing :).

    Keep in mind it’s a demo and there is a lot of optimisation to do on the C++ level, but it gives a good idea of the integration of the 2 libraries.

    And, yeah, i’ll have to check how to record the sound with ffmpeg on linux…

     
  • frankiezafe 13:08 on 2017-01-17 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , video   

    screenshot01172017_125756932

    New example ready for skeletons manipulation.

    In the example, the skeleton debugging is enabled by default. It shows the bones hierarchy and the local orientation of each bone.

    There is 3 transformation spaces for bones, inherited from Ogre3D:

    • LOCAL
    • PARENT
    • WORLD

    All methods to get or set orientation, scale and position are sensitive to this value, except the moveBone methods, not yet finished.

    The example shows also the different ways to retrieve information about the skeleton: list of bone’s name, list of bone objects, access via name, id or pointer, etc.

    The beautiful model i destroy if from Sophie Khan and distributed by #additivism.

     
  • frankiezafe 19:24 on 2017-01-11 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , glitch, , , , , video   

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    Cool day today: the creation of the example.glitch was quite fun.
    The example demonstrate a bit more extensively the usage of the ogre’s compositor (see here) and the interaction with shaders.

    If you test the example, ckeck CustomApp::createCompositor: you’ll find comments about how to interact with the shader’suniform.

    The superb model in this scene is gearthing4 by shivinteger, distributed by #additivism.

     
    • xuv 00:57 on 2017-01-12 Permalink | Reply

      Wow. Looks awesome. Indeed, add some sound and it’s a finished piece. 🙂

  • frankiezafe 20:27 on 2016-11-09 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Menthol, , timeline, , video   

    Mentholed blender

    related issue in bitbucket

    blender-ui

    menthol-geditor-todo

    A long time ago (2 years maybe), i’ve worked with yacine sebti to make a bridge between a timeline editor in max/msp (yacine’s world) and openframeworks (my former world). The project was called Menthol. This prototype has been used in the void project.

    The openframeworks addon is here: https://bitbucket.org/frankiezafe/ofxmenthol

    During a 1 hour phone call with yacine, we discussed about how to build a standalone UI for the project. Several ideas where floating, such as a fully custom UI in openframeworks or a QT version, such as Iannix. This one is very good looking, even if yacine and i think that it is not precise enough for our usage.

    Then, like each time we spoke about this, blender pops in.

    I always liked the graph and the dope sheet panels. It’s a superb 2d simplification, with a lot of features (i just discovered the modifiers, my head is spinnin’!). I quickly draft the modifications to do on these panels to work as a standalone timeline editor.

    I’ll investigate this in december!

    nb: this feature is part of the polymorph engine presentation :), see here

     
    • xuv 20:59 on 2016-11-09 Permalink | Reply

      Just saying… Not perfect… but [CTRL]+[T] give you time in seconds instead or next to the frame number (It’s unfortunately not consistent)

  • frankiezafe 18:18 on 2016-10-09 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , ogre, , video   

    After some posts with images, schemas and long technical descriptions, here is the result.

    The chain is breaking when there’s too much stress along the links…

     
  • frankiezafe 18:17 on 2016-10-03 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , video   

    How to prepare meshes and its physical version in blender usable in polymorph engine?

    How it’s looking like once done in the right way:

    For this mesh (a kind of quad pods not very well done):

    triball-screenshot01

    You can resume the shape with:

    • 4 boxes, surrounding the legs of the shape
    • and 4 spheres, surrounding the ends of each legs.

    To do so, design the collider using cubes and sphere (low resolution ones, i’ve used 10×5 just because it will look nicer in the screenshots :)).

    Attribute a different material to each part using this naming convention:

    • material for boxes starts with “box_”;
    • material for spheres starts with “sphere_”.

    The different colors of materials is just to make the screenshot clearer.

    triball-screenshot02

    Apply a triangulate modifier to ensure you don’t have any ngon in your meshes.

    Once all this is done, export the meshes using blender2ogre addon.

    The importation steps will be described in the full tutorial, with the complete documentation.

     
  • frankiezafe 19:52 on 2016-09-24 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , video   

    Demo of physics in polymorph engine.

    A lot of stuff has been fixed since yesterday, but severe improvments are still to be done.

    In the video, only convex hulls and simple colliders (cubes & spheres) are used.

    To add a custom collider on a PNode, you call:

    pnode.load( sceneManager, “General”, “my-high-resolution.mesh” );
    pnode.physics( polymorph::BT_DYNAMIC_CONVEX, “General”, “my-low-resolution.mesh” );

    “my-low-resolution.mesh” will be used to calculate physics.

    Using convex is a problem for the blue thingies: the torus is not empty, but convered by an invisible “skin”. Therefore, other objects can not go through this huge hole… The issue should be solved by using the btGImpactMeshShape, but the shapes are behaving strangly when enabled. They jumps all the time…

     
  • xuv 00:01 on 2016-09-24 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , F/LAT, KDEnlive, , , video,   

    Polymorph weekly news #7 

    rendu_object_21sept4

    Welcome @louise! As a new member, she just joined the Polymorph team and this post will be presenting her to you and hopefully tell you more about her role and interest in the Polymorph project.

    I did not know Louise Baduel before having a conversation with her a couple hours ago. All I knew is that @frankiezafe had met her during the Blender workshop he gave at iMAL a few months ago and that he had offered her to work on the video game project he is working on for the company Contredanse.

    So Louise is a choreographer, dancer and videographer living in Brussels. She co-founded the dance collective System Failure and is interested in studying and understanding the relation between sound and performance. She also does video editing and wanted to start manipulating 3D objects and create them. That’s why she decided to come to a Blender class. She admitted having downloaded Blender 6 years ago, but needed a little push to get up to speed with the technology. And apparently, François’s classes were very helpful in that sense. So helpful that Louise agreed to join the Polymorph team and jump full time in Blender on a Linux system.

    Louise told me she had been quite interested in libre and open source software for a while. She is fed up with Apple’s logic. “I need to get out of this, she said. But working with video has been a show stopper for me as it is not as easy to do with Linux.” Now that she’s been working with Blender and Linux intensively for the past two weeks, she said she was ready to try video editing with Blender. She also tried KDEnlive last week but found it to be missing some features compared to FinalCut. But she likes this new approach to making things and will definitely experiment more now with this fully open source toolbox.

    At the same time she arrived at Polymorph, she also discovered F/LAT. She said she appreciate the feeling there and that everybody is happy to be helping each other when there is a problem or a question around open source software. “There is always someone available to answer a question” she said, and that helps her learn a lot every day.

    As you may have seen from @louise posts on this website, she is working on “Tuning Scores”, the code name for now for the video game being developed with professional dancers in mind. Tuning Scores is actually a series of techniques for dancers, put together by Lisa Nelson, to develop spontaneous compositions. And Polymorph is commissioned by Contredanse to port this into the virtual world of an interactive application, or so called, video game.

    There is many challenges in a project like this. It will be a game for two players. And there will have a palette of 3D objects to play with. The objects will be kept simple but the rules governing their behavior will be complex. Special attention will be given to the sound each object makes. The point here is not to be literal but to create a sensation. Dancers work with their feelings and need to feel the space they are in. The virtual world needs to be rich enough to invite the participants to interact with it and with each other. How will a dancer perceive the presence of another dancer in the game? How will they communicate? How can a dancer perform according to the rules of “Tuning Scores”? The players need to be able to repeat a set of actions s·he just made or play it backwards, freeze or sustain it. And overall what would be the purpose of this tool?

    Definitely there is a demand from Contredanse to get the word out about the “Tuning Scores” practice and the work of Lisa Nelson. This is one of the reason to come up with a project like this, but where could this head up to? Since sound is involved and reactive to the players actions, it could be a way to create or compose music. It could also be an application to put 2 dancers distant from each other physically and have them interact in the same room. It could also possibly be an instrument for live performance.

    All these questions will hopefully find an answer in the coming months, but they are certainly driving Louise research right now, with the help of the rest of the Polymorph team. This is a unique project and possibly the first of its kind. So keep an eye on this website for regular posts in this matter. And don’t worry, @frankie hasn’t left the development of PEEL. It’s advancing. Bullet is now integrated. But I’ll ask all about it when I’ll chat with Francois next week.

    In the meantime, stay tuned, and share responsibly.

     
  • frankiezafe 19:37 on 2016-09-06 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , motion, , , video   

    Navigation along the structure.

    After some refactoring, the system starts to behave nicely:

    • objects position, size and orientation are described in an xml, much easier to modify
    • gaps (the space between joints, marked by a white sphere), are rendered automatically by the engine
    • camera rig (a hierarchy of objects including camera and lights) is able to move along the structure, from cluster (orange boxes) to boxes
    • when 2 gaps are vailable in a cluster, it’s possible to choose wich one to solve
    • camera orient itself according to the selected gap

    I have to plug back the resolution of gaps, disabled for now. Moving a segment will cause issue, for sure. More about this very soon!

    The tricky point was to manage the camera correctly when its orientation is not aligned with the world axis anymore. The camera is parented to a node called origin. When the orientation of origin change, the UP axis used to update camera has to be given before calling lookAt for instance.

    Vector3 local_up( 0,1,0 );
    local_up = origin->getOrientation() * local_up;
    cam->setFixedYawAxis( false, local_up );
    cam->lookAt( origin->getPosition() );

     
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